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Oculus

Abstract #90455 Published in IGR 21-3

Short-Term and Long-Term Variability of Intraocular Pressure Measured with an Intraocular Telemetry Sensor in Patients with Glaucoma

Mansouri K; Rao HL; Weinreb RN;
Ophthalmology 2021; 128: 227-233

See also comment(s) by Luciano Quaranta & Giovanni De Angelis


PURPOSE: To evaluate the short-term and long-term variability of intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma. DESIGN: Prospective study. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-two patients previously implanted with a sulcus-based IOP sensor (EyeMate, Implandata GmbH, Germany). METHODS: Twenty-two patients previously implanted with the EyeMate were requested to obtain at least 4 IOP measurements daily. Data were grouped according to the eye and the medication so that an eye treated with a particular medication was considered as one group, and the same eye treated with a different medication during the observation period was considered as a different group. A day was divided into 7 periods: night, midnight to 5:59 am; early, 6 am to 7:59 am; morning, 8 am to 10:59 am; noon, 11 am to 1:59 pm; afternoon, 2 pm to 5:59 pm; evening, 6 pm to 8:59 pm; and late, 9 pm to 11:59 pm. Short-term variability during a particular period was defined as the variability in IOP measurements obtained during that period on different days within 3 months of each other. Long-term variability was defined as the variability in IOP measurements obtained during a particular period on different days over a period of 1 year or more. Variability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). RESULTS: The mean age of study participants was 67.8 ± 6.8 years and 36.4% were women. The mean follow-up duration of patients was 19.2 ± 21.3 months (median, 9 months; range, 1-58 months). Overall, 92 860 IOP measurements over 15 811 measurement days were obtained and analyzed during the study period. The number of measurements obtained from each eye ranged from 1 daily to 277 daily. Intraclass correlation coefficients for short-term variability among the 7 periods during the day ranged from 0.52 (morning) to 0.66 (early). Long-term ICCs ranged from 0.29 (night) to 0.51 (late). CONCLUSIONS: Continual IOP monitoring showed that IOP has moderate short-term and high long-term variability in glaucoma patients. These findings demonstrate that single IOP measurements do not characterize day-to-day variations in IOP. Moreover, they show the importance of continual IOP monitoring in glaucoma patients.

Glaucoma Research Center, Montchoisi Clinic, Swiss Visio Network, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado.

Full article

Classification:

6.1.1 Devices, techniques (Part of: 6 Clinical examination methods > 6.1 Intraocular pressure measurement; factors affecting IOP)
6.1.2 Fluctuation, circadian rhythms (Part of: 6 Clinical examination methods > 6.1 Intraocular pressure measurement; factors affecting IOP)
6.19 Telemedicine (Part of: 6 Clinical examination methods)



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